Hindu Heritage Study Program
 
0
 
\
o
\
00
o
 
Hindu Heritage Study Program
 
o
o
Principles and Practice of Hindu Dharma
o
o
o
-HR 201.08
The Decline of the Society over the years and the time for Renaissance
The Problems and the Challenges for the Faith, for the Society and its Culture
-~ Level - 2 ~
o
00
\ \  
-
 
-
-
Lesson - E 03 :
A Society that was divided by Greed
The laws of Karma and Varna used for Classe
Please see below
for Lesson - 02
--
\ \  
 

The pre-Aryan society, like many other European, Polynesian and East African societies, already had certain horizontal divisions of the people, with upper and lower classes. This was conveniently added to the theories of Varnas. As the 'Vedic Aryans' from North moved to the South, the Priests met with the 'Dravidian Kings'. Both groups, with all the fights they had, wanted to perpetuate their dynastic rules and to keep their positions for ever. They both saw the benefits by this and modified the Vedic teachings to suit their own classes in society.

The Gunas and Varnas were mistaken for familial characters, assuming sons of educators and warriors shall be educators and warriors, to their advantage. They were misinterpreted by the priests and kings, to guarantee the progeny an assured vocation of the family, very much like a trade union guarantee. As people moved from place to place and new vocations were taken up, new subclasses were also introduced, each one claiming superiority over others, at the same time accepting inferiority to some others at all levels of the Hindu Society for ever.

The "Law of Karma" and rebirths were also used conveniently to perpetuate this practice. People at the lower end of the ladder insisted more on these laws and accepted it more violently and practiced it, for the fear of wrath of the "Gods". As Vedic rules and rituals became strict, people who did not follow these teachings and Dharma became outcasts and untouchables.

In the early Vedic times, people in one class could achieve entering other classes and intermarriage was an acceptable practice. They could study the Scriptures to become the priests or become warriors and kings or Merchants by appropriate study and training. This changed with times as the Kshathriya kings started ruling the small kingdoms in Central India and several other parts of India.

During the time of "Later Puranas and Later Dharshanas", about 900- 1000 AD, inter-community marriages and inter-dining were denied and became a taboo. All these prejudices and burden of classes had to be carried on by the children of successive generations of the society and there were no escapes from it except in rebirth by "Good Karma ".

 
 

0

 
\ -  
-
Lesson - E 04 :
Classes and Divisions in Hindu Society
The laws of Varna Dharma and Ashrama Dharma
--
 
\ \  

In the classless society, Vedas established the Four colors or qualities, "Varnas" according to each person's physical and mental capacity, capability, ambition and desires. Thus the classes of "Educators, Warriors, Merchants and Servants" as social classes of equal levels, a vertical division of the society, was established to perform all the duties. The activities of the communities were organized with a division of labor in an efficient way. As the Vedic rituals became very elaborate and complicated, the priests had an upper hand in the society in the maintenance of Dharma (the rule of law). They could command a leadership over the people and their kings. The kings naturally had the power and physical leadership of the people. Often the priests were considered to be at a lower level in the ladder. This caused a competition among them in the name of the religion, God and the society. This is similar to the social histories of many other regions of the world, where every group wanted to show their superiority to another group and rule over them.

The "Varna Dharma" were originally instituted according to one's ability, ambition and knowledge and as inborn (genetic) qualities, very much like in any educational or social institution. The Vedic teachings describe the three "Gunas" or personal qualities of people, namely "Satvika", "Rajasika" and "Tamasika". Different Varna will have different combination of Gunas. Purusha Sukta in Rigveda describes the four Varnas which should be taken as to mean the "Gunas" or individual characters and not families of persons. Some people say there were only three Varnas. All are eligible to study the Vedas. "Janmanaa Jayate' Sudrah: Samskaaraah Dwija Uchyathe'. Veda Pathanthu Vipraaha Brahma Jñanamthu Brahmanaaha." All are born as Sudras. After they dedicate their life to the teachings of the Vedas and gain the wisdom and knowledge of "Brahman", they become "Brahmana". This is just to show that all these qualities work together as essential parts or limbs of the society. Perhaps the Gunas and the Varnas belong to the "Soul" as a person's desire and not to the body by his birth. However, the greatest misfortune for the Hindu society is the later changes that occurred about "Varna Dharma".

 
0    
 
 
 
 
 
 
\    
\
o
 
Chapter - 8: Epilogue - Decline of a Culture and a Time for Renaissance - Lessons E 03 & E 04
o
 
 
0
Lessons:~: E01 & E02 :-: E03 & E04 :-: E05 & E06 :-: E07 & E08 :-: E09 & E10 :-: E11 & E12 :~:
 
 
o
 

00